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    • Signs of heart disease present in obese children
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      Posted on July 29, 2012

      According to a study published in Archives of Disease in Childhood journal, two thirds of obese children exhibit a problem with their health which is a contributor to heart disease. High cholesterol, blood sugar and high blood pressure may already be present by 12 years of age.

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  • Signs of heart disease present in obese children

    Filed under: News — Posted by: Linda on

    According to a study published in Archives of Disease in Childhood journal, two thirds of obese children exhibit a problem with their health which is a contributor to heart disease. High cholesterol, blood sugar and high blood pressure may already be present by 12 years of age.

    From 2005 to 2007, research was conducted in the Netherlands, collecting the data of 500 children, 307 of which were suffering from severe child obesity. Doctors in the UK have warned that the same problems could also be present in British children as type 2 diabetes is diagnosed in children from the age of seven years old.

    More than half the children in the study were diagnosed with high blood pressure, a similar number had high levels of the ‘bad’ cholesterol and almost one percent had type 2 diabetes. One case of child obesity in the group could be linked to medical problems rather than lifestyle. Almost one third of children who were classed as severely obese came from a single parent family.

    Official data in England for boys aged between two and 15 years old indicate that the proportion of boys suffering child obesity rose from 11.1 percent in 1995 to 19.4 percent in 2004. However, since 2005 the figure has fallen to 17.1 percent in 2010. The number of obese girls also increased between 1995 and the year 2005 but fell to 14.8 percent in 2010.

    The study indicates that children suffering from severe obesity could be at risk of heart disease at a much younger age.

    2 Comments »

    1. Nobody seems to be taking any notice of the dangers associated with obesity, mothers stuff their children with rubbish food just to keep them happy.
      I would make it a law that any food detrimental to the health of children would get an instant ban, with possible fines.
      They are our children not the big businesses children.

      Comment by Gordon Youd — July 30, 2012 @ 5:49 am

    2. Stigma and discrimination of children based on their physical appearance or body size is resulting in physiological reactions to this stress. The pressure to reduce their body size in not only extremely difficult, if not impossible, it is BAD FOR THEIR HEALTH.

      As outlined in a 2007 report from Yale’s Rudd Center:
      “Research so far suggests that obesity may increase vulnerability to adverse physiological reactions to psychosocial stressors among youths. Experiences of weight stigma may specifically exacerbate negative health outcomes through heightened blood pressure, cortisol reactivity, and risk for hypertension. Given that similar findings pertaining to obesity and vulnerability to stress are emerging in both children and adults, it may be that obesity beginning in childhood heightens vulnerability to a long-term trajectory of negative physical responses to chronic psychosocial stressors. This could in turn increase various cardiovascular risk factors. These health problems often affect overweight children. Many of the negative psychosocial consequences of weight bias occur above and beyond the influence of high body weight, and this appears to be the case for negative health consequences as well (Matthews et al., 2005). Therefore, the health consequences common among obese children may partly result from the effects of discrimination.” (Puhl & Latner; Stigma, Obesity, and the Health of the Nation’s Children; 2007)

      Studies show that dieting, even that considered “naturalistic”, among young people lead to weight cycling [Naturalistic weight reduction efforts predicted weight gain and onset of obesity in adolescent girls; http://ebn.bmj.com/content/3/3/88.full

      There is an evidence-based compassionate alternative to conventional dieting: Health At Every Size®. Please consider this alternative prior to making a decision that may result in weight cycling.

      I would also like to recommend the free NAAFA Child Advocacy ToolkitSM (CATK) and other written guidelines/resources. The NAAFA Child Advocacy Toolkit shows how Health At Every Size® takes the focus off weight and directs it to healthful eating and enjoyable movement. It addresses the bullying, building positive self-image and eliminating stigmatization of large children. Additionally, the CATK lists resources available to parents and educators or caregivers for educational materials, curriculum and programming that is beneficial for all children. It can be found at:
      http://issuu.com/naafa/docs/naafa_childadvocacy2011combined_v04?viewMode=magazine&mode=embed

      For more information on Health At Every Size, you can find a general explanation on Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Health_at_Every_Size) or find in-depth research-based information in the book Health At Every Size – The Surprising Truth About Your Weight by Dr. Linda Bacon (http://www.lindabacon.org/HAESbook/).

      Comment by Darliene Howell — July 31, 2012 @ 7:56 am

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